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Art For Medicine

These folded broadsides were made as part of the Art As Medicine Action by the artist at the 3rd IMPACT Print Conference held August 27-30th, 2003 at the Michaelis School of Art in Cape Town, South Africa. The letterpress printing was begun at The Artist’s Press in White River, South Africa. During the Impact Print Conference, Bill Lagatutta and 2 assistants printed the lithograph parts of the print on an offset lithograph press at Michaelis School of Art. This print is a medication action and a political satire on the HIV medication access problem in South Africa.

Click on image Click on image Art For Medicine
2003
Lithograph, Letterpress on Arches paper

Folded broadside with outside lithograph of South Africans dying of AIDS. When opened, the offset lithograph Warhol dollar signs interior is cut through the center, forming 11 x 7 ¼" leaflets. When folded down, the 5 ½ x 7 ¼" leaflets display text explaining the letterpress, lithograph interior political satire. Crushed HIV medications are inside the folded flaps and fall out when the broadside is opened.

Printers: Mark Attwood, Bill Lagatutta, Andrea Steer, Ernstine White, Joseph Lagate
Folded: 11 x 7 ¼". Unfolded 21 7/8" x 14 ½". Edition: 27

 
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The outside image on the broadside is a lithograph of AIDS deaths in South Africa. When opened, IT’S NOT ALL ABOUT MONEY, is printed on a four color offset lithograph of Warhol $ signs. When the interior flaps are unfolded, crushed HIV medications fall out and get on the hands of the viewer. The exposed text describes what is visually depicted in the interior print. The South African President and Health Minister have Posada-like calavera bodies. Treatment Action Campaign members are protesting the lack of access for HIV treatment for South Africans. Global Pharma CEO’s stand nearby in front of a bank, on a large pile of skulls. Yusuf Hamied, the Indian generic pharmaceutical company CEO raises his hands in protest. Images from the making of the broadside are on my website www.DocArt.com.

When opened, the offset lithograph Warhol dollar signs interior is cut through the center, forming 11 x 7 ¼" leaflets. When folded down, the 5 ½ x 7 ¼" leaflets display text explaining the letterpress, lithograph interior political satire. Crushed HIV medications, discarded by patients in Dr. Avery’s clinic in the United States, are inside the folded flaps and the powder falls out when the broadside is opened. Discarded HIV medication was mixed in the printing ink.

Sales of Art For Medicine will provide antiretroviral (ARV) treatment to South Africans with HIV/AIDS through the Treatment Action Campaign Treatment Project. In South Africa, 600 people are dying each day from AIDS. Since March 20, 2003, more than 26 of the TAC leaders and activists have died of AIDS-related illnesses. Most of these lives could have been saved with the appropriate use of ARV therapy. In South Africa, it costs between $100 and $200 (USA) per month to provide medications and proper medical care for a person living with HIV/AIDS. By the end of 2004, TAC aims to place 1000 people across South Africa on treatment.

 

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